The Chinese Quest http://www.thechinesequest.com Five Hungry Jewish Guys' Quest to Find the Best Chinese Restaurant on Long Island Tue, 20 Jun 2017 20:37:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.thechinesequest.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/cropped-TCQ-32x32.jpg The Chinese Quest http://www.thechinesequest.com 32 32 Simple method to make Simple Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/chinese-broccoli-oyster-sauce/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/chinese-broccoli-oyster-sauce/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 20:37:52 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10643 Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce is a favorite eating dish of Chinese people.

There are numerous healthy benefits of eating Chinese Broccoli. AND, it tastes great too!

Why not try out these super ease and quick recipes and enjoy ALL the benefits of Chinese broccoli. You will love it. And so will your family!

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Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce is a favorite eating dish of Chinese people. You’ll find this unique and tasty dish almost on all menu’s in good restaurants in China.

You would probably find many methods of making Chinese broccoli with oyster Sauce on many websites and recipe books, but I am going to share the unique and perfect way to make the Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce.

If you want to learn about this process, Click here to know more information about how to cook Polish sausage. On the top of all, have a look at the nutrition level of this recipe:

Benefits of Chinese Broccoli

  • Chinese broccoli is full of the vitamin C and rich in many nutrients. It is loaded with the folic acid and dietary fiber.
  • Chinese broccoli is used more often than to lose the weight. The vitamin C and dietary fiber play a substantial role to get rid of the pounds.
  • Chinese broccoli is best to regulate the blood vessels. Many studies have found that Chinese broccoli is best for the heart patients.
  • Chinese broccoli is wonderful that can help the cardiac patients. It helps to reduce the bad cholesterol level from the blood and improve the good cholesterol level in the blood.
  • The antioxidants in the Chinese broccoli play a vital role to reduce the inflammation from the human body. Many studies have revealed the fact that Chinese broccoli reduces the inflammation.
  • Some recent developments suggest that Chinese broccoli is also pretty much effective against cancer.

Oyster Sauce has many ingredients

Therefore, Chinese broccoli must be included into your diet to get unlimited health benefits. Now, let’s come back to the delicious Chinese broccoli with the oyster sauce.

Actually, Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce does not come with one ingredient of oyster sauce. Many websites and blogs claim that the oyster sauce is just one ingredient that multiplies the taste, but I am going to let you know about the real dish.

Serving with Oil Topping

Unfortunately, restaurants in the China serve Chinese broccoli wit oyster sauce by topping it up with the extra oil. The extra amount of oil really destroys its texture and taste. It is so unfortunate that the real outlook and taste of Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce has been changed significantly with the passage of time.

But, of course, you do not need to get panic because I am going to share the method that is almost oil free. The original recipe of Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce contains very low amount of oil.

Steam in the Microwave

First of all, let’s see how to prepare the first part, Chinese broccoli. Of course, I’ll let you know the real method to make oyster sauce later on, but the first part is to learn to steam the Chinese broccoli.

This is a very sorrowful situation that restaurants have completely changed the recipe of Chinese broccoli. The original recipe is to steam the broccoli. However, most of the restaurants just fry the Chinese broccoli for a while in the oil.

The frying in the oil has very health-related concerns. This method reduces the natural texture of the vegetable and it starts losing its nutrition level as well.

Studies have reported that if any vegetable is fried, then it will not be as effective as it is naturally. So is the case with the restaurant chefs; they deep fry the Chinese broccoli and ruin the natural benefits.

On the other hand, I strongly recommend steaming the Chinese broccoli in the oven. What you need to do is just wash the leaves of the Chinese broccoli and apply some salt on it.

Wrap them in the cling wrap and out into the microwave for a couple of minutes. Turn of the microwave after a couple of minutes and there comes out the fresh and smoky vegetable.

 Chinese-broccoli

 

Method to prepare Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce

Unlike the restaurants and professional chefs, the method I am going to share to make the Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce is the perfect, unique and it will turn out to be tasty as well.

You should steam a couple of bunch of Chinese broccoli in the microwave as I told earlier.

Ingredients

  • large bunch Chinese broccoli 
  • 2 tbsp water
  • tsp corn flour 
  • 1 tbsp Chinese cooking wine 
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger
  • tbsp vegetable oil
  • tsp sesame oil
  • tsp sugar

Preparation time

The total preparation time is 3 minutes. It means that you’ll arrange your material within 3 minutes.

Cooking Time

On a good note, the cooking time is just 5 minutes. It means that you can make it just on the go. It is pretty easy and simple to make.

Total Time

Total time to make the Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce is just 8 minutes. Yes, only 8 minutes.

Instructions

  • Steam the Broccoli in the microwave as described earlier.
  • Mix water and cornflour in a pan and mix well. Add all other ingredients and boil the mixture. Boil it for a minute and make it a thick mixture.
  • Pour over the Chinese broccoli and hurrah, you have done it in just 8 minutes. 

Please keep in mind that Chinese cooking wine can be swapped with sherry. Please strain the sauce because it has garlic and ginger.

I hope you have come to know that the method I have shared to make the Chinese broccoli with oyster Sauce is entirely different than the methods that you’re read on the internet. This is the original recipe for the Chinese broccoli.

Chinese-Broccoli-with-Oyster-Sauce

 

How to Cook Polish Sausage?

Hello, hold on, the game is not just over with the Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce, do you love to eat Polish sausage? Are you searching to know how to cook Polish sausage? Don’t worry; I’ll let you know how to cook the Polish sausage. 

You must know the important key points before making the Polish sausage. Polish sausage is made in a variety of ways.

You must pick your desired meat first to make the Polish Sausage. You must prefer the pork meat and you should avoid the turkey and beef meat. You must also stay away from the ingredients that have a smoky taste because it will have a bad taste in the end product.

Anyhow, these were the general points to keep in mind before making the Polish Sausage. I am sure you will be able to use these points to help you cook Polish sausage in future.

polish-sausage

About the Author Lita Watson:

Lita-WatsonHi there! I’m Lita, voice of Quick Easy Cook and I’m absolutely in love with cooking blogs. I’m a beginner in cooking and i try my best to make it quick and easy. Even though, it’s not always quick and easy to keep up with fancy dinners… so i keep learning and blogging about quick and easy ways to create delicious and yummy foods for my two kids and a wonderful husband.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

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[REVIEW] TAO’S PEKING DUCK HOUSE, GLEN COVE http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/review-taos-peking-duck-house-glen-cove/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/review-taos-peking-duck-house-glen-cove/#comments Mon, 19 Jun 2017 15:54:42 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10633 More and more authentic Chinese restaurants are opening all over Long Island, and now with Tao's Peking Duck House opening in Glen Cove, we have another to choose from!

This is their sister restaurant to their Selden and Stony Brook locations.

How does it stack up?

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The Chinese are coming! The Chinese are coming! The great migration is happening and I am loving every minute of it! With two locations out east, Tao’s Peking Duck House has opened in Glen Cove. The new location is 188 Glen Cove Ave. Tao's-Peking-Duck-HouseThe restaurant is sparsely decorated with mustard brown paint on the walls, and not much thought  into the decor. Tao’s has about ten tables with two enclosed booths. Piped in Chinese music creates an authentic Chinese ambiance.

Our waiter for the evening is Howard Chu, a real pleasant guy who was extremely helpful with the ordering. With no liquor license, we had to scramble for some alcohol. Not a problem at this location with a beer distributor and a liquor store in a one block radius. Peroni’s were the pick of the night. Beer always compliments a good Chinese meal.

Our starters included Spare Ribs (our staple when available), and the Steamed Dumplings. The ribs were meaty with perhaps a little too much fat. The sauce on the ribs was perfect, not too much sweet, and more on the subtle side. Not the best ribs, but nicely done. The Steamed Dumplings were very disappointing. The inside meat was tasty enough, but the dumplings were way too doughy. Compared to many a dumpling that we tasted on this journey, these fell way flat.

Tao's-Peking-Duck-House-SpareribsTao's-Peking-Duck-House-Spareribs

We proceeded to order a lot of dishes. Our first dish was of course the Peking Duck. Peking Duck is one of China’s signature dishes with a royal lineage going back more than 700 years. It originated during the Yuan Dynasty (1271 to 1368), a time when mongol emperors ruled China. The chef comes out of the kitchen to operate on this beautiful bird-see video provided. With surgeon-like skills, the duck is ready for eating. From here on out, it is all self serve. Starting with a flat pancake, we begin to build the signature dish. Duck meat, crunchy skin, scallions, cucumbers, & hoisin sauce. I always love a good Peking Duck, and this one did not disappoint. Although I prefer the fuller, sweeter buns to the flat pancake variety, the duck was nicely done. With plenty of leftovers, Howard suggested one of two dishes, either duck soup or a duck sautee. We chose the latter, and it came back to the table sauteed with onions and peppers. At this point, I was a little “ducked” out, but it was still better than wasting the meat.

Other dishes that we ordered:

Shrimp with Garlic Sauce was surprisingly sweet, served with tree mushrooms in a garlic sauce.

Cumin Chicken was of course spicy, served with onions, green peppers, and a flat and very flavorful chicken.

Shrimp-Garlic-SauceCumin-Chicken

Tofu Fish in Spicy Sauce was prepared with flounder and tofu in a spicy brown sauce. I am not a tofu lover, but the fish was excellent.

Double Sauteed Pork was my favorite dish of the evening. Pork with green and red peppers and black bean was a little spicy and really good.

Tofu-Fish-Spicy-SauceDouble-Sauteed-Pork

Our waiter brought out a truly “authentic” Chinese dessert – macaroons with honey & cocoa powder. MacaroonsIt tasted more Italian than Chinese, but was delicious and “on the house”.

In small print, the menu proclaims a 15% discount with orders over $50, and a 20% discount with orders over $100. This deal brought the check down to $30 per man, pretty good considering that we ate like we were sentenced to the electric chair! The menu is a nice mix of real deal Chinese, and Long Island Chinese. A banquet section of the menu that is all in Chinese has a “Chef’s Special” that will set you back $388, and Tao’s Celebrate with Guest meal for $588.

Tao's-Peking-Duck-House-MenuTao's-Peking-Duck-House-Menu-Page

Tao’s Peking Duck House is a perfect example of what is happening to Chinese food in LI. With some self described sadness, the old Jewish Chinese is withering away, and making room for authentic and varied types of Chinese. Wow, what a time to be alive and Jewish on Long Island!!!!!

Our Rating:

Rating-Tao's-Peking-Duck-House-Glen-Cove

All for now,

Mee Tsu Yan

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20 Best Rice Cookers http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/best-rice-cookers/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/best-rice-cookers/#respond Mon, 12 Jun 2017 23:27:54 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10605 Are you in the market for a rice cooker, or looking to upgrade or replace the one you have? Check out the 20 best rice cookers on Amazon!

You know that Amazon has the largest selection and usually the lowest prices around. And with millions of shoppers to offering their reviews, you can shop with confidence that these truly are the best rice cookers!!

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If you’re going to cook your own Chinese food at home, you are going to be including rice in almost every dish, or meal you prepare.  If you are like me you don’t own a rice cooker.  Yet!  If you are like me, you LOVE to shop on Amazon.com where you will always find the world’s largest selection of items typically at the lowest price around.  And we are going to help you find the best rice cooker for your money!  What Jew doesn’t like a bargain?? 😉

So, without further ado, here are the 20 Most popular rice cookers on Amazon.  Please note, that this list is updated hourly.  And in the air of complete transparency, these items contain affiliate links.  If you purchase any of these items, The Chinese Quest will receive a small fee, which helps us to offset the cost of maintaining this website.

Best Rice Cookers

We welcome your reviews of these, or any other, rice cookers you have tried.  Please post them in the comments below.

Now that you’ve got your rice cooker, you are ready to try some of the Chinese food recipes we have posted.

Now get cooking!!

Which were your favorites of the ones we have posted?  Please share with us your recipes.  Do you have a recipe you would like to share with others?  Please let us know, and we would be glad to publish it!!

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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Are You Hungry for Some Chinese Food? http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/hungry-for-chinese-food/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/06/hungry-for-chinese-food/#comments Fri, 02 Jun 2017 20:11:43 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10556 You just ate some great Chinese food thanks to one of The Chinese Quest's recommendations. You had some Carvel Ice Cream to complete your most sumptuous meal. An hour later your stomach is yearning for yet MORE food!!

Why?? Here's why!

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You just ate some great Chinese food thanks to one of The Chinese Quest’s recommendations.  You had some Carvel Ice Cream to complete your most sumptuous meal.  An hour later your stomach is yearning for yet MORE food!!  Why?  What are you going to do?

How about Chinese?

Here they are, the top 10 reasons why you feel hungry an hour after eating Chinese Food:

    1. MSGA Chinese gentleman I work with told me that this is due to the effects of mono-sodium glutamate (MSG), which, in addition to enhancing the flavor of food, acts as an appetite stimulant, leaving the consumer with a sensation of hunger, despite having eaten. In some people, MSG produces even less desirable effects, such as headaches and nausea.
    2. It could be the high glycemic load– there’s white rice, there’s white noodles, there’s sugar and white flour somewhere in the main dish, there’s more white rice, and then there’s a fortune cookie made of sugar and white flour. glycemic-indexIt spikes your insulin, you get full fast, and then you crash and need more food. An interesting experiment would be to make a typical American Chinese restaurant type meal using wheat flour, brown rice, and an unprocessed sweetener such as rapadura or agave nectar, and to give it to people who didn’t know what the experiment was about and seeing if they got hungry again soon after eating it.
    3. Chinese food is traditionally very low in fat, and it’s the fat in food that keeps you feeling full longer. The Chinese themselves tend to fill up on carbs (rice, noodles) and mostly vegetables at their meals (they eat MUCH less meat than we do in the West), so it may be that you’re actually not eating enough (you say you don’t eat too much)! I don’t think it’s MSG, as that’s simply a flavor enhancer derived naturally (from beetroot), most Chinese restaurants don’t even use it any more (and haven’t for years), and those that do would only use a tiny, tiny amount.
    4. While there is some protein in any of the meat options you have, the rest are full of carbs and sugars. This will make you feel extremely full right after eating, but usually once your body has processed the carbs and broken them down to just sugar, your body is hungry again.
    5. Researchers now believe the culprit may be carbohydrates. More specifically, certain types of carbohydrates, including rice and pasta. carbohydratesThese carbohydrates have a high glycemic index (GI), which means the body needs to produce extra insulin to digest them. Certain diet doctors believe consuming these carbohydrates can cause overeating, since excess insulin causes the blood sugar to plummet, creating a hungry feeling.
    6. Noodles and rice are the staple of most Chinese dishes. Both are very easy to digest and turn to sugar which your body uses very quickly. So if you eat a dish high in simple carbohydrates likes noodles, rice, or potato, you may get a sugar spike and a burst of energy followed by tiredness and hunger.
    7. Because real Chinese food is very low in essential fats and essential amino acids. They also tend to be high in empty calories (white rice, refined flour, refined sugar) which has lots of calories but no nutrients. When you don’t give your body essential nutrients, it will make you hungry until you have consume enough of them.
    8. Typically Chinese buffets tend to load the food up with MSG so you feel fuller after eating less. Thus they save money because you’re not eating as much as you normally would.
    9. The preservatives are most likely making you dehydrated.  Dehydration often gives you the false sense that you are “hungry”.
    10. Chinese food is full of sodium. Sodium is salt, as if you didn’t know that. Salt makes you thirsty, that’s why at the bar they serve peanuts or pretzels for free so that you will order more drinks. So really you are thirsty not hungry.

So?  What ARE you going to do?  Of course!  ?You are going to order more Chinese food!!  Check the map below to find another Chinese restaurant near you!!

 

Map of our Chinese Restaurant Reviews and Articles

Basic Google Maps Placemarks error: JavaScript and/or CSS files aren't loaded. If you're using do_shortcode() you need to add a filter to your theme first. See the FAQ for details.

Legend:

excellent-chinese-restaurantExcellent Chinese restaurant!  Rated greater than 4.50 (on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being the best score)

above-average-chinese-restaurantAbove Average Chinese restaurant.  Chinese Quest rated between 4.00 and 4.50

average-chinese-restaurantAverage Chinese restaurant.  Rated between 3.00 and 3.99

below-average-chinese-restaurantBelow Average Chinese restaurant.  Rated lower than 3.00

unrated-chinese-restaurantUnrated Chinese restaurant.  No formal review of this restaurant has been performed.

closed-chinese-restaurantClosed Chinese restaurant that we reviewed or wrote an article about.

Clusters:

blue-cluster-of-Chinese-restaurantsBlue clusters indicate there are between 2 and 9 different Chinese restaurants in that region, with the number on the cluster giving the number of Chinese restaurants in that region.  Click on the cluster, or zoom in repeatedly as necessary to reveal the map markers showing each Chinese restaurant in that region.

yellow-cluster-of-Chinese-restaurantsYellow clusters indicate there are between 10 and 99 different Chinese restaurants in that region, with the number on the cluster giving the number of Chinese restaurants in that region.  Click on the cluster, or zoom in repeatedly as necessary to reveal the map markers showing each Chinese restaurant in that region.

red-cluster-of-Chinese-restaurantsRed clusters indicate there are greater over 100 different Chinese restaurants in that region, with the number on the cluster giving the number of Chinese restaurants in that region.  Click on the cluster, or zoom in repeatedly as necessary to reveal the map markers showing each Chinese restaurant in that region.

 

How do you sate your munchies?  Please sound off in the comments below.

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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How To Make Yuan Yang In 4 Easy Steps http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/how-to-make-yuan-yang-4-easy-steps/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/how-to-make-yuan-yang-4-easy-steps/#comments Wed, 31 May 2017 01:43:37 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10579 The history of tea dates back to the early Chinese civilization, about 5000 years ago. One such tea that is prominent in the Chinese culture is the “Yuan yang”, or "Coffee with Tea".

Yuan yang is a tasty combination of homemade milk tea and freshly brewed coffee.

This drink is perfect for fast-paced workers and all-nighters as both tea and coffee are loaded with caffeine.

Learn how to make it in this article.

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The history of tea dates back to the early Chinese civilization, about 5000 years ago. The first tea was an accidental discovery of a Chinese emperor. It was made of several leaves from a wild tree seeping into boiling water. Tea’s popularity grew rapidly across the globe, resulting in the rise of different varieties and brewing styles.

Yuan-Yang-Tea-Coffee

One such tea that is prominent in the Chinese culture is the “Yuan yang”. If you’re not a Chinese local, you’ve probably heard of Yuan yang as “coffee with tea”. The Yuan yang is a tasty combination of homemade milk tea and freshly brewed coffee.

Yuan-yang-is-what-you-will-get-when-you-combine-coffee-tea

Yuan Yang is what you’ll get when you combine these two

This particular tea is a staple of every tea shop in Hong Kong. Yuan yang is a delicious and energizing beverage. This drink is perfect for fast-paced workers and all-nighters as both tea and coffee are loaded with caffeine. If you’re neither of the two, it’ll be wonderful to enjoy this beverage paired with cookies for an afternoon break.

Hot or cold, this tea will surely awaken your senses. Also, it’s incredibly easy to prepare!

Making The Perfect Yuan Yang

Tea specialists say that the ideal Yuan Yang ratio 1:3 or 3 parts coffee and 7 parts black milk tea.

If you’re more of a coffee person, then you can reverse the ratio. You can also opt for a 1:1 distribution if you dislike a dominating taste or you prefer a fairly strong taste from both.

Additionally, choose decaf coffee and tea if you’re keeping your blood pressure at bay or you’re just not prepared for jitters.

For this recipe, we’ll be using half coffee and half tea.

What You’ll Need

  • ¼ cup black tea leaves/ 7 black tea bags
  • 4 cups black brewed coffee (freshly ground beans)
  • 1 can evaporated milk (12 oz)
  • 7 tbsp sugar

Serving Size: Makes 6-7 mugs

The step-by-step

Step 1. Brew tea leaves or tea bags (strings removed) in 4 cups boiling water. Let it steep for 4-6 minutes – the longer it steeps, the stronger is tastes.

Step 1

 

Step 2. While waiting for tea to steep, brew coffee using 4 cups water. For convenience, use a coffee maker.

Step 2

If you lack this machine, you can opt for a French press. Learn how to brew coffee using a French press below.

Still no French press? No problem! Use a coffee filter for drip-over coffee. Know how to execute this method below.

 

Step 3. Combine brewed coffee and tea into a carafe or large bowl.

Step 3

 

Step 4. Add sugar and milk. Pour in all of the milk if you want a creamy texture. Otherwise, pour according to your preference. Stir thoroughly.

Step 4

 

Step 5. Serve hot or with ice for the best iced coffee-tea ever.  Enjoy!

Step 5

Go for iced Yuan yang for your coffee break

Most of the time, the 1:1 coffee to tea ratio works. The ratio is also dependent on the coffee’s strength and type of tea you’re going to brew.

Use the 1:1 ratio for your first brew. You can always experiment and adjust the ratio the next time you make Yuan yang.

Author bio:

Maria Hayes

Maria-HayesI am a 27 yr. old self-proclaimed food enthusiast with a penchant for cooking (and eating) virtually all forms and shapes of food. My inner foodie led to the creation of Mamatestataqueria.com . This blog chronicles my food adventures, original recipes, and reviews of awesome cookwares and similar products. I aim to provide answers to food-related questions and inspire readers to channel their inner chefs.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

Please share this article if you enjoyed it! click-to-share

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A Quick Run to New Fu Run in Great Neck http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/new-fu-run-great-neck/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/new-fu-run-great-neck/#comments Sat, 27 May 2017 02:02:28 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10567 New Fu Run is an authentic Chinese restaurant in Great Neck, NY. Mini Mee and I took a quick run there this evenings to enjoy their Soup Dumplings and more!

When you dine at New Fu Run, you'll find a lot of Chinese dishes that you never tried before. Try 'em! And let us know what you think of New Fu Run in the comments section below!

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Mini Mee was hankering for some Soup Dumplings, so he and I made a quick run to New Fu Run in Great Neck this evening.  Though you won’t yet find them on their menu, don’t let that stop you.  For you know, if you follow The Chinese Quest, that you’re always going to get unbiased Chinese restaurant reviews AND the inside scoop.    This marks the second time that I have been there.  The first with the my mispucha, since we were in the ‘hood and had to check it out.  A formal review will be made at a later date.

Though we have reviewed their sister restaurant, Fu Run in Flushing.  One noticeable difference is the elegance of New Fu Run.  This is the kind of experience Gold Coasters come to expect.  Now they just have to get used to authentic Chinese food.  Though they have made some concessions on their menu by adding a few Americanized Chinese dishes, you must try some of their other offerings from their very extensive menu.

For now, you will have to “settle” for this appetizer, or teaser, of an article until our official review.

Selling the Sizzle

Beef on Sizzling Platter

(turn up the volume!)

This dish was as delicious as it sounds and looks.  Kind of like a Beef Fajita.  Only Chinese.  And better!!

Soup Dumplings – Always a Mini Mee favorite!  And he wasn’t disappointed with these!  He made them disappear before dear old Dad could have a second one!

Fried Rice with Chicken – Dad approved.  Mini Mee endorsed!!  The portion size was so big, that it would have been good for a table of five!  We had lots left to take home.  And as I am typing, Mini Mee is devouring the last of it!

Sauteed Squid Leg – This was from our prior visit.  Something we had never tried before – and I’m sure when you run to New Fu Run, you’ll find a lot of Chinese dishes that you never tried before.  Try ’em!  And let us know what you think of New Fu Run in the comments section below!

Sauteed-Squid-Leg

I hope that we have whetted your appetite for more of New Fu Run.

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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Your Blood Pressure On Chinese Food http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/your-blood-pressure-on-chinese-food-2/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/your-blood-pressure-on-chinese-food-2/#comments Thu, 18 May 2017 20:27:06 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10542 Does Chinese food really deserve its healthy reputation and can it lower your blood pressure? You bet it does, if you stick to dishes with these ingredients!

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Glorious Chinese cooking… it’s hard to imagine anyone who doesn’t like it. I could easily live off Chinese food every day!

Usually cheap and always cheerful, Chinese restaurants have spread to every street corner of the world. Of course it’s always a treat to eat but concerns for a healthy diet have certainly helped to make Chinese cuisine even more popular.

We often hear how healthy Chinese cooking is: low in meat and saturated fat and rich in fresh, crunchy vegetables and healthier types of oil such as sesame and peanut oil.

But does Chinese food really deserve its healthy reputation? In particular, does it contribute to lower blood pressure and a healthy heart?

Leaving aside the issue of enjoyment for the moment (as hard as that is to do) let’s look at the facts both for and against Chinese food as healthy eating. First, there are definitely some important elements in its favor; let’s look at some common Chinese ingredients:

ginger-rootGinger:  This fragrant tuber/herb is ubiquitous in Chinese food, one of the 3 or 4 cornerstones of this style of cooking. Ginger has long been prized as a general tonic and stimulant. It offers a long list of medicinal benefits that include acting as a digestive aid and an anti-inflammatory.

Even more importantly, recent research reveals that ginger contains powerful compounds called “gingerols” that act to relax the walls of blood vessels. This in turn allows blood vessels to dilate and the improved blood flow lowers blood pressure. In this way, ginger acts directly to influence our blood pressure in a healthy way.

Garlic:  Another cornerstone ingredient of Chinese cooking with many effects that are similar to ginger. Volatile garlic compounds also act to relax and open blood vessels. In fact, garlic has such a positive effect on circulation that it has long been offered in supplement form to improve cardiovascular health.

Like most foods, however, garlic is most beneficial in its natural and whole state as used in cooking. And eating Chinese food can be an enjoyable way to consume garlic in abundance.

chili-pepperChili Peppers:  Growing numbers of people are learning to enjoy eating peppers: the hotter the better! Now we know that spicy food is not just a sensual delight but also extremely good for the health.

Despite the sensation of tensing up that some people experience eating hot peppers, their internal effect is just the opposite. Capsicum, the active ingredient that makes peppers hot, is able to relax blood vessels and thus lower blood pressure. Other compounds in peppers are known to thin the blood and reduce its “stickiness”, further contributing to better circulation.

Chili peppers pack a double-barreled punch in both taste sensation and health benefits; the hotter, the healthier! Regional Chinese dishes such as those from Szhechuan and Hunan are often rich in chili peppers as well as garlic and ginger.

Chinese cooking often contains even more healthy ingredients that are sometimes missing from our diet including fresh vegetables and unusual spices. What’s more, the fast and furious style of Chinese cooking in woks can be healthier than Western styles as it tends to lock in natural flavors and nutrients.

So Chinese food really does score many top marks for healthy eating – but it also has an unhealthy side that its fans tend to minimize or outright ignore.

In fact, too much of certain types of Chinese food can be a recipe for high blood pressure or worse!

That’s because those healthy herbs, spices and vegetables are often accompanied by heaps of sugar, salt and, surprisingly, fat. Some people also react badly to the MSG (mono-sodium glutamate) used as a flavor enhancer in many Chinese restaurants, although its effects tend to be only temporary.

Many Westerners are not aware of the vast differences between a “common” Chinese diet and the dishes we are familiar with from Chinese restaurants. If you visit an establishment where local Chinese people eat you will typically see them eating large bowls of soup, often with noodles. These soups tend to be loaded with vegetables and are in most respects a very healthy way to eat. You will rarely see overweight people among the Chinese diners eating this type of dish.

High blood pressure “Hong Kong Style”

The popular Chinese dishes among Westerners, however, are a different kettle of fish. These tend to be what the Chinese consider “banquet” food, which is only served for special occasions. These are the sweet, sticky, sour and pungent dishes we tend to be familiar with… all our favorites!

These wonderfully sweet, tangy and crispy delicacies are made that way through loads of sugar, salt and fat: the three major fast-food demons. As if that’s not bad enough, many of them, especially those scrumptious starters, are deep-fried. No wonder the Chinese save them for special occasions; a daily regime could give you a heart attack!

blood-pressure

But with rising prosperity in Asia this type of eating – along with its health consequences – is becoming more common. Obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease, once rare in the Orient, are becoming much more frequent. In particular, Chinese health authorities are becoming increasingly concerned about the amount of salt in the Chinese diet.

Of course you can’t separate eating from enjoyment. Chinese food would not be the treat it is without the sugar, salt and deep frying. But it should be a treat only. A regular diet of banquet-style Chinese cooking is a sure recipe for hypertension and heart disease. Most of the time we should take our cue from the traditional Chinese diet and stick to healthy soups, vegetables and noodles.

Author Bio:

David-OHaraToo much sweet and sour lately? Visit the author’s website to learn about a unique new way to get lower blood pressure and kickstart a healthier lifestyle. David O’Hara is a lifelong writer and researcher in natural health.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

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Chinese Style Baked Beans http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/chinese-style-baked-beans/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/chinese-style-baked-beans/#comments Mon, 15 May 2017 21:58:35 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10528 Summer is almost here. Ah summer! Summer conjures up thoughts of BBQ'ing. AND baseball! Hmm, baseball? Gotta have hotdogs! What goes with hotdogs? Baked Beans!

But wait!! Isn't this a blog about Chinese food? Yes! Ok, better make them Chinese style baked beans! Ahh, that's better now! What? You never heard of Chinese style baked beans?

Well then, you must read this article...

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Summer is almost here.  Ah summer!  Summer conjures up thoughts of BBQ’ing.  AND baseball!  Hmm, baseball?  Gotta have hotdogs!  What goes with hotdogs?  Baked Beans!  But wait!  Isn’t this a blog about Chinese food?  Yes!  Ok, better make them Chinese style baked beans!  Ahh, that’s better now!  What?  You never heard of Chinese style baked beans?  Well then, you must read this article by Edith Parker of “No Meal No Health (Cooking & Healthy Food)”.

Craving for your favorite baked beans? No need to order! This article will teach you an easy Chinese-style baked beans recipe that you will love!

Everything You Need to Know on How to Make Chinese Style Baked Beans with Pork is Right Here!

Do you love baked beans? Do you spend lots of money on Chinese take-out just to have a taste of your favorite Chinese-style baked beans every night? Well, isn’t it wiser if you will learn how to whip up the most amazing Chinese-style baked beans right at the comforts of your home?

In this way, you will not have to wait for the delivery guy, and you can have access to your favorite dish anytime you want! Plus, you do not have to worry about the judgment you get from the operator for ordering the same thing every single night!

But as we all know, achieving an authentic Chinese style taste is not that easy. Lucky for you, I have already done my research, and I would like to share with you the fruit of my efforts. So if you are ready, read on!

What You Will Need

For the baked beans:

The amount of ingredients indicated in this list will yield 10-12 servings of baked beans.

  • 1 pound of dried navy beans
  • 8 cups of water
  • ½ cup of ketchup
  • 2 teaspoons of Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ cup of maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 3 tablespoons of brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons of molasses
  • ¼ teaspoon of black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon of chili powder
  • 1 small onion (chopped)

You can use canned baked beans for this, but I believe that baking your own beans is a healthier option and it also allows you to customize the taste of the beans to suit your preference.

For the Chinese Style Minced Pork:

The amount of ingredients indicated in the list will yield about 6 servings only.

The Marinade:

  • 300 grams minced pork
  • 1 tablespoon of oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon of smoked sweet paprika
  • 1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine
  • 1 teaspoon of Chinese five spice
  • The Pork and Beans Casserole:
  • 1 medium-sized carrot (chopped)
  • 1 stick of celery (chopped)
  • 2 cloves of garlic (finely chopped)
  • 2 onions (diced)
  • 1 can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 red chili (chopped finely)
  • 1 teaspoon of rice vinegar
  • 1 piece bay leaf
  • 3 ginger slices
  • 1 tablespoon of fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon of sugar
  • 1 tablespoon of tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil
  • 1 whole star anise
  • Add salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 can of water (use the can of tomatoes to measure the water)
  • Spring onions or coriander for garnish

Step-by-Step Guide on How to Make Chinese Style Baked Beans with Pork

Are you ready to learn how to cook an authentic Chinese style baked beans? Read on!

Part I. Making The Baked Beans from Scratch:

Step 1. Soften the beans.

navy-beans

Place the beans in a colander and rinse it under cold running water. Use your hands to sort through the beans to remove any unwanted items. Place washed beans in a large Dutch oven. Add 8 cups of water. Cover then let it soak overnight. Discard the soaking liquid.

Pro Tip: If you don’t have the time, you can boil the beans instead of soaking them. After adding 8 cups of water, place the beans over medium heat and bring it to a boil. Reduce heat and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove the beans from heat, cover and let it cool for 1 hour. Discard water afterwards.

Step 2. Cook the beans.

After rinsing, return the beans to the Dutch oven. Add in 8 cups of water. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat. Simmer for 1 ½ hours or until the beans are tender. Stir it from time to time. Drain the beans and set the liquid aside.

Step 3. Bake the beans.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. In a bowl, mix the maple syrup, ketchup, brown sugar, salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce, molasses, and chili powder. Set it aside. Pour the beans into a casserole dish. Stir in the resulting mixture and chopped onion.

Add enough amount of the soaking liquid to cover the beans by ¼ inch. Cover with foil and bake for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 200 degrees Fahrenheit then cook for 6 hours more. Stir the beans after 3 hours of cooking.

Pro Tip: You can store excess baked beans in the refrigerator (where they can last for 5 days) or place them in sealer bags and freeze them. In this way, you will only have to defrost and reheat the baked beans when you wish to prepare this recipe again!

Part II. Marinating the Pork

Mix all the marinade ingredients. Soak the minced pork in it and allow it to marinade for a couple of hours.

Part III. Preparing the Chinese Style Baked Beans with Pork Casserole

Step 1. Fry the vegetables then the pork.

Recipe-chinese-style-baked-beans

(Image source: thebigfatnoodle.com)

Add cooking oil in a saucepan. Stir in onions, celery, garlic, chili, carrots, and ginger. Add a pinch of salt and fry for 5 minutes.

After 5 minutes, push the vegetables to one side of the pan. Add the minced pork on the free space in the pan. Do not move around the pork too much. Let it be for a minute or so then flip to the other side.

Step 2. Add in the beans.

Once the pork is already browned, stir it with the veggies. Add the tomatoes, water, baked beans, bay leaf and star anise. Add all sauces and black pepper to taste. Stir it well, bring to a boil and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Stir it twice during the simmering process.

Step 3. Serve.

Baked Beans with Pork

Before serving, remove the star anise, ginger slices and bay leaf from the mixture. Garnish with coriander or spring onions on top. Serve over rice.

Conclusion

Did you enjoy our simple tutorial? We hope you do!

Knowing how to cook an authentic Chinese-style baked beans with pork is a recipe is a must for beans and Chinese food lovers out there. Not only will it help you save money— but it can also allow you to customize the taste according to your preference.

If you have any comments or suggestions, share them in the comments section! I would love to hear from you!

Author Bio:

Edith-ParkerHi, My name is Edith Parker. I am a wife and mother of three with almost 8 years of cooking wholesome, healthy, and balanced meals for my family. I would love to write articles about cooking and healthy food.

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

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[REVIEW] Saaho Village, Great Neck, NY http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/review-saaho-village-great-neck-ny/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/review-saaho-village-great-neck-ny/#comments Fri, 12 May 2017 00:34:24 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10512 Saaho Village, an authentic Chinese restaurant in Great Neck, NY, opened a few days ago. The Chinese Quest came this night to write this review.

Their menu features Ho Fun aka Saaho Fun, or handmade rice noodles. Their food was unlike any Chinese food we ever ate before! Read our review and please post your comments on our blog.

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We’ve seen it coming.  The seeds were planted over the last few months, and now the bean sprouts have sprouted all over Great Neck  Great Neck could be coming the new epicenter of authentic Chinese restaurants.  First is was New Fu Run opening two months ago.  And now, Great Neck welcomed Saaho Village on Monday, and The Chinese Quest last night!

Saaho Village is located at 69 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck, NY 11021, almost diagonally across from New Fu Run.  I would suggest it is a very strategic alignment actually.  Authentic Chinese food is “foreign” to a lot of the residents here.  But as people discover one, or the other, they will be drawn back to try the other one.  And soon a third authentic Chinese restaurant will be joining those two in Great Neck Village.

Sahoo-Village-Chinese-Restaurant-exterior

Perhaps The Chinese Quest can take some of the credit, because we are starting to find more and more authentic Chinese restaurants opening all over Long Island.  Pretty soon you won’t have to travel far (to far off places like Flushing and Chinatown) to find really great Chinese food again!

But today we celebrate the Grand Opening of Sahoo Village with our review.

Sahoo-Village-Chinese-Restaurant-Grand-Opening

Sahoo Village’s Mission

Southern China is home to many styles of artisan noodle making,  For hundreds of years, Saaho, a small village in Guangzhou, was known to produce one such exquisite noodle – called “Ho Fun” or ‘Saaho Fun”, bearing the name of its place of origin.

Knowing that making rice noodles by hand is fast becoming a lost tradition, they have invested countless hours in learning and perfecting the time honored 8-step process for making Saaho rice noodles.  Spencer Chan, our founder and established restauraunteur in Modern Chinese cuisine, using organic rice, quality seasonal ingredients, traditional techniques, and innovative creative license, has created a deliciously exciting menu to showcase our take on handmade Saaho rice noodles.

With the experienced leadership of Spencer Chan, member of Les Disciples D’Auguste Escoffier, and recipient of many accolades, including the Star of Excellence for Achievement of Gastronomie, we’ve been successful in creatively reinventing and popularizing Hong Kong and Cantonese cuisine in New York, with our previous F&B ventures — Sweet-n-Tart, Golden Unicorn, and 20 Mott Street Restaurant. We now invite you to take this new culinary journey with us!

Let’s see how they did!

Our appetizers:

Caviar Fish Wraps (flounder, caviar, tofu sheet) – Gold Coasters can savor, and brag about this.  We’re going to boast about them too!  Lest one of us get shut out, we ordered two portions.  Like magic, we made them disappear!  Especially the caviar!

Caviar-Fish-Rolls

Shrimp & Asparagus Spring Rolls – We noticed they use a lot of asparagus in their dishes.  Perhaps chosen because they are in season now.  Also of note, is the ample use of bean sprouts.  I’ve never ever tasted fresher, nor better bean sprouts!  I loved this dish!

Shrimp-Asparagus-Spring-Roll

Fried Stuffed Eggplant (stuffed with fish) – What a colorful, and delicious little dish!  It’s getting to the point now, that I’m loving Eggplant (at least eggplant made the Chinese way).

Fried-Stuffed-Eggplant

Before we motor on to our Entrees, it bears noting just how fresh, and healthy their food is.  And, if you are Vegan, they have many Vegan dishes on their menu.

The Entrees

Shrimp with Broccoli Tiny Tiles (Malaysian belacan shrimp paste, okra, red & green peppers, onion, ho fun with diced broccoli) – I don’t know what those “tiles” are made of that adorn the rim of the serving dish they come in.  But they are not like anything I have ever eaten before.  It should be noted that all of their entrees are only slightly larger than most appetizers would be,  Be prepared to order more dishes off of the menu.   That said, we liked this dish.  We just wish that there was more shrimp.

Shrimp-Broccoli-Tiny-Tiles

Black Pepper Filet Mignon with Quinoa Tiny Tiles (filet mignon cubes, asparagus, black pepper sauce, ho fun made with organic quinoa) – Some of these bites of filet mignon were so scrumptious as they were slightly moister than others,  Even still, it was one of our favorite dishes.Black-Pepper-Filet-Mignon-Quinoa-Tiny-TilesSmoked-Duck

Smoked Duck Breast (osmanthus honey glazed crisp skin smoked duck breast, sugar beets) – Close up above; Full dish below.  I really liked the smoked flavor and taste.  No one would confuse this dish with Peking Duck.  The main reason being is that it isn’t!
Smoked-Duck-Breast

House Special Ho Fun and Eggplant (ho fun and eggplant, smothered in house special sauce made with dried squid and cured duck, steamed in lotus leaf) – Now we couldn’t write a proper review if we didn’t order one of their signature dishes, could we?  We appreciate the fine attention to detail in creating this dish.  But, to be honest, it wasn’t one of our favorites.

House-Special-Ho-Fun-Eggplant-Pork

Just Desserts – Saving first for last!

SesSahoo-Village-Chinese-Restaurant-Sesame-Balls-Granolaame Balls (crispy glutinous rice sesame ball, egg yolk cream, topped with granola) – We didn’t order this, but a friend of ours was wrapping up this meal with her friend just as we arrived and insisted on sharing it with us.  This was yummy!  Fair warning, the content were hot!!  The granola was, as was everything else, so fresh and moist, we hoped it would be served in a bowl with some milk!

Final Thoughts

We ordered a lot.  The portions were small.  The food was unlike anything we ever had before.  The service was impeccable.  The restaurant immaculate (You have to check out the rest rooms.  Wear earplugs.  The hand dryers were more powerful, and as loud as jet engines!  Sahoo-Village-Chinese-Restaurant-MenuWe can only assume that they had similar dryers in the women’s rest room).

The menu was very unusual.  It was difficult to flip through as the pages snapped closed if you let go.  It was on the small side.  And speaking of sides, on one side was the food menu.  You flip it over for the drinks menu.

The bill came out to $150 for five of us. 

And now, our rating of Saaho Village:

Sahoo-Village-Chinese-Restaurant-Rating

Humbly submitted for your consumption,

Mee Magnum (“Chop!  Chop!”)

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China, Chopsticks & Some Table Manners (Plus A Quick Guide On What To Eat Healthily During Your Visit!) http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/china-table-manners-eat-healthily/ http://www.thechinesequest.com/2017/05/china-table-manners-eat-healthily/#comments Mon, 08 May 2017 23:59:56 +0000 http://www.thechinesequest.com/?p=10483 When in China... Manners an etiquette reign supreme. Learn how to eat properly. And, as an added bonus, learn to eat right with some of these healthy choices!

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If you’ve been forced by your family or friends to travel with them to China and found yourself utterly clueless as to how you’re going to blend with its culture and “certain” table manners, you are not alone. I myself was subjected into such an ordeal years ago. And as a frequent traveler in China now, that embarrassment is now buried alongside those weird gestures I displayed when I first fed myself with chopsticks.

beef-with-broccoli

Consider this entire discussion as your quick guide to China’s permeating culture on its food and general manners. Along the way, I’ll also be disclosing some of the crucial ways to observe when using chopsticks. By the end of this article, you can daresay that you belong rightfully in this East Asian nation (well, at least in terms of its etiquette!).

I’ll be dividing this piece into sections in which China is quite critical on. Right before our conclusion, I’ll be outing some of the healthy Chinese food you can opt for when you’re visiting this country. Without dilly-dallying, let’s start on how the Chinese people are behaving when eating.

Via: http://www.daringgourmet.com

How Do Chinese People Eat?

Don’t be too startled, the Chinese just like the rest of us, also observe some table manners when eating. As such, dining habits are heavily expected from the attendees no matter which culture you come from. Generally, you should observe the following points when you get to be seated with them.

1)    Ensure that you let the older people eat first

Once the elder in the table announces “let’s eat,” that’s a safe cue for you to start eating. Otherwise, try your hardest not to touch any food on the table unless you’d want those eyes staring at you for the rest of the meal.

2)    The art of bowl-picking

Seriously. There is quite a meticulous procedure on picking up a bowl in China when eating. Start by picking it up using your thumb on the mouth of the bowl. Your first finger along with the middle and third fingers should support the bottom of the bowl with an empty palm.

The Chinese and The Importance of Seating Arrangement

In China, you just don’t want to sit wherever you intend to, as the seating arrangement in this country is regarded as the most important part of the Chinese dining etiquette. Wait for the host to direct you to your seat.

When you arrive, it is of prime importance that you introduce yourself first. If there’s an off-chance that the master of the banquet takes this opportunity to introduce you to unknown people, make sure that express your gratitude for this gesture.

Whenever the guest of honor or the most senior member is not seated yet, you’re not allowed to sit yet. The same goes in the manner of eating: When these individuals are not eating yet, others should not begin to consume the food on the table either. Meanwhile, the first toast during this interaction should come from the seat of honor and be taken next by whoever’s next by the order of prominence.

China & Its Table of Manners

1)    The Utmost Consideration For Others

When you get this urge to look and dig for the meaty ones in a dish, you need to stop yourself right at that moment. Apart from keeping your eyes glued on a certain plate when eating, these manners are deemed to be tacky by the Chinese people. In this respect, always take the food first from the plates that are in front of you as opposed to grabbing the plates in the middle.

Moreover, when you’re eating your favorite dish, try not to devour it like a horse. It’s crucial that you consider the other attendees at the table. Meanwhile, if there’s not much left on a plate and you wish to consume it, consult the others first. If they decline, you can proceed to eat it.

Other manners under this section that should be considered are:

  • Avoid watching the television.
  • Turn off your smartphones.
  • Dealing with other activities while having a meal.

2)    The “Thank You” Gesture

The Chinese way of expressing their gratitude is usually performed when a waiter or a waitress serves you a tea while you glean on the menu and look for something to order. After this, you may tap the table with your first two fingers 2 or 3 times to show your “thank you” to the pourer for his or her service. This gesture should also signal the pourer that they need to stop pouring the tea.

3)    Elegance Matters

Picking up too much food at a time is considered to be uncouth under the Chinese table manners. When you take food on the table, ensure that you don’t nudge against your seatmates or avoid splashing your food or soup on the table.

Here are the other manners you should be aware of:

  • Close your mouth when you’re chewing your food before you swallow it. As such, don’t fill your mouth with food that you can’t even chew well yourself. This very act leaves a gluttonous expression on them.
  • Use chopsticks or a hand to remove bones or other inedible parts of the meal from your mouth before you put them by the side of your plate in front of you. This should tell you that spitting them right onto the table or ground is unappealing.
  • Always use a tissue or a napkin to ditch the food remnants around your mouth.
  • Try not to converse with others when your mouth is full. If there’s a need to talk, speak quietly.
  • Whenever a need to cough or sneeze arises, use your hand or handkerchief to cover your mouth. Turn your face away when doing this.

Just how do you use chopsticks the Chinese way?

  • Don’t poke your chopsticks in vertically into your food or rice as this is synonymous to funerals in China. During funerals, sticks of incense are stuck in a pot by the rice that is placed onto the ancestor’s altar.
  • Waving your chopsticks that much into the air is frowned upon.
  • When picking up food, exert a sufficient inward pressure onto the chopsticks in order to grasp the food tightly. Then, move the components you’ve managed to secure in your mouth or bowl as smoothly as possible. Dropping your food is considered a bad form in China.
  • When separating a piece of food into two pieces, put a controlled pressure on your chopsticks as you take them apart. This is perfected over time and practice.
  • Use servings spoons or chopsticks (the ones that didn’t come from your mouth) when picking food from the central dishes.
  • Now, if you’ve gotten to a point in which you really can’t afford using chopsticks without embarrassing yourself, ask the staff from that restaurant to provide you with a spoon or fork.

Your healthiest alternatives in China

This section is especially dedicated for those who are looking for the healthiest food options when navigating through the often menu-abundant Chinese restaurants:

1)   Hot & Sour Soup / Wonton Soup

These savory starters should set you back about 80 to 100 amount of calories by just having a single cup.

2)   Vegetable Spring Rolls

These contain about 80 calories per roll on average. So if you’re heading out with your friends for some fried egg rolls by the street, opt for these spring rolls instead.

3)   Steamed Veggies & Lean Protein

If you’re trying to look for an L-carnitine supplement replacement to build some muscle mass during your visit, you can look for any dish that consists of steamed vegetables and lean protein such as chicken, scallops, shrimp, fish or tofu) with sauce. Other alternatives include “The Buddha’s Delight” which is filled with steamed veggies and protein-laden tofu.

For more information about “L-carnitine” and its wonders on muscle-building and weight loss, you may visit this site – https://bodyshape101.com/best-l-carnitine/

4)   Chicken With Broccoli

This combination should provide you a guilt-free 280 calories. If you want to lower the calorie count, you can opt for a small amount of sauce on the side.

5)   Shrimp With Lobster Sauce / Garlic Sauce

If you’re gunning for an ultra-lean protein, you can never go wrong with these two. The former has 450 calories while the latter has 700 calories. Share these with friends so you could break the total calorie count in half.

Final thoughts

As China is also coming from an ancient civilization, its beliefs and culture on its food and table manners have been observed for the longest time from its ancestors right down to its descendants today. And just like each and every culture in this world, it is of paramount importance that these are observed when you get the chance to visit and eat with them.

Performing these rituals and manners should show them that you have taken time to understand them and that you treat its beliefs with respect.

Author bio:

Emily-BrathenEmily is founder of BodyShape101, a blog where she and her associates talk about exercise, fitness, and yoga. Their aim is to help people like you to achieve perfect body. BodyShape101 is concentrated on exercise & fitness tips, and making the most out of it. She is also a mother of one and she tries to find balance between her passion and her biggest joy in life.

 

The Chinese Quest welcomes original articles pertaining to the Chinese dining experience.  Your article should pertain to Chinese restaurants, Chinese food, recipes, etc.  For more information, please contact us.

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